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Art in India


Country of India on the Continent of Asia

Art in India

Rise of Indian Art

Contemporary Art in India

Kalamkari Arts – A Traditional Textile Art of India

[excerpt from the website Kalamkari Art ( https://knack4dimpossible.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post-new.php)%5D

Kalamkari refers to a method of painting natural dyes onto cotton or silk fabric with a bamboo pen or kalam. The name kalamkari translates as pen (kalam) work (kari) in Hindi/Urdu, and was most likely derived from trade relationships between Persian and Indian merchants as early as the 10th century CE. European merchants also had names for this type of fabric decoration: the Portugese called it pintado, the Dutch used the name sitz, and the British preferred chintz. The name kalamkari is used prominently today, and is synonymous with both painted and hand blockprinted textiles that incorporate natural vegetable/organically-derived dye stuffs. While there are many forms of kalamkari throughout India and the world, the focus of this site is on extant kalamkari practice in Sri Kalahasti, Andhra Pradesh, in South India.

One for the records

[Excerpt from the website Rangoli Designs ( http://www.dltk-kids.com/world/india/mrangoli.htm )]

Rangoli is a popular art form among Indian women.  Rangoli are painted on the ground in front of houses using colored rice powder — sometimes supplemented by flower petals and other colorful materials.  Rangoli are typically painted during the tamil month of Maarkazhi (between December 15th and January 15th)

[Excerpt from the website Rangoli and Kolam ( http://www.ikolam.com/kolam )]

Rangoli is the popular floor art of India. It is an auspicious art of decorating courtyards and prayer halls in India drawn mainly by women and girls. Some women use rice flour to draw a rangoli which is the traditional medium to be used while others use sandstone or limestone powder. The designs are then colored with various colored powdered dyes. Although this floor-art is known as Rangoli commonly in many parts of India, it is known as Kolam in Tamil Nadu, Muggulu in Andhra pradesh, Rangavalli in Karnataka, Poovidal or Pookalam in Kerala, Chowkpurana in Uttar Pradesh, Madana in Rajasthan, Aripana in Bihar and Alpana in Bengal.

The colorful kolam tradition dates back to the Indus Valley Civilization (2500 B.C). Kolams were often drawn with coarse rice flour since it served as a food source to nature’s creatures like ants and crows. Rice flour is seen as an offering to Lakshmi, the goddess of rice and wealth. The goddess has the power to attract prosperity and to prevent poverty from entering the home. In this category you’ll find all kinds of small and big kolam designs which are further categorized for various occasions.

[Excerpt from Wikipidia ( I know, I know, but just to give you a better idea) ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rangoli )]

Rangoli is a traditional decorative folk art of India. These are decorative designs made on floors of living rooms and courtyards during Hindu festivals and are meant as sacred welcoming areas for the Hindu deities.[1] The ancient symbols have been passed on through the ages, from each generation to the one that followed, thus keeping both the art form and the tradition alive. Rangoli and similar practices are followed in different Indian states; in Tamil Nadu, one has Kolam,[2] Madanae in Rajasthan, Chowkpurna in Northern India, Alpana in Bengal, Aripana in Bihar, and so on. The purpose of Rangoli is decoration and it is thought to bring good luck. Design-depictions may also vary as they reflect traditions, folklore and practices that are unique to each area. It is traditionally done by women, but over the years modern additions have been adapted. Generally, this practice is showcased during occasions such as festivals, auspicious observances, celebrations of marriages and other similar milestones and gatherings. Rangoli designs can be simple geometric shapes, deity impressions, flower and petal shapes (appropriate for the given celebrations), but they can also become very elaborate designs crafted by numerous people. The base material is usually dry or wet granulated rice or dry flour, to which Sindoor (vermilion), Haldi (turmeric) and other natural colors can be added. Chemical colors are a modern variation. Other materials include colored sand and even flowers and petals, as in the case of Flower Rangolis.

[excerpt from the website Diwali Rangoli Patterns and Designs ( http://www.theholidayspot.com/diwali/rangoli.htm )]

Rangoli designs are generally based on themes that have been in use through ages. The common rangoli themes are the celestial symbols such as the rising sun, moon, stars, zodiac signs, holy symbols like Om, mangal kalash, swastika, chakra, a lighted Deepak, trident, “shree”, lotus etc. Goddess Lakshmi in the lotus symbolizes the figure of renewed life. Other popular themes are natural images like flowers, creepers, trees, fish, birds, elephants, dancing figures, human figures and geometrical figures such as circles, semi-circles, triangles, squares and rectangles. Drawing Diwali rangoli at the entrance door of individual homes is the common sight during Diwali decoration. For this, the footsteps of Goddess Lakshmi entering into the home are designed at the main entrance of the home or near the place of worship, which indicates the entrance of prosperity in the home. This is the special Diwali rangoli for the entrance. It is considered auspicious as it signifies showering of good luck and prosperity on the house and in the family.

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2 responses to “Art in India

  1. I don’t normally comment on blogs.. But nice post! I just bookmarked your site

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